Failed referendum boosts Fidesz popularity, as support for Jobbik tumbles

Communication must truly be everything and reality is perhaps little more than a fleeting and malleable perception. The first public opinion poll conducted after the anti-migrant referendum, which failed to reach the minimum turnout threshold to be considered valid, shows major gains for Prime Minister Viktor Orbán’s ruling Fidesz party and a marked drop in support for Jobbik–a party that started its political career on the most extreme fringes of the far-right, but which is now more moderate than the extremist Fidesz.

Závecz Research, an independent polling firm not aligned with the government, conducted its poll after two critical, highly reported events: the end result of the October 2nd referendum and the politically motivated shuttering of Népszabadság, the country’s largest opposition print daily. The poll found that support for Fidesz rose by 4% since September, to 49%. This is also much higher than where the ruling party was in August, when its popularity stood at 43%. It is clear that the over-the-top anti-migrant campaign and government-orchestrated fear mongering has increase the ruling party’s base of supporters.

The real loser, however, appears to be Jobbik. Now that Fidesz has assumed the far-right language once associated primarily with Jobbik, the party is bleeding away support to the government. Since August, Jobbik has lost 5% in support and now stands at just 17%. The Hungarian Socialist Party (MSZP) continues to trail badly at 14%, having lost 3% in support over the last two months. The Democratic Coalition (DK), led by former Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsány, dropped 1% and now has 8% in support, while the Politics Can Be Different (Lehet Más a Politika -LMP) green party continues to hover at 5%.

Viktor Orbán observes a simulated terrorist attack in Budapest, and the subsequent counter-terror response.

Viktor Orbán observes a simulated terrorist attack in Budapest, and the subsequent counter-terrorism response.

All other smaller liberal and left-leaning parties are far below the 5% threshold necessary for representation in parliament, with Együtt (Together) at 3% and Párbeszéd (Dialogue), as well as the Hungarian Liberal Party at 1%.

A staggeringly large percentage of Fidesz voters (82%) believe that Hungary is headed in the right direction under Prime Minister Orbán. In stark contrast, 90% of MSZP voters and 96% of DK supporters are pessimistic about where Fidesz is taking the country.

2 Comments

  1. It’s not the failed referendum it’s Orban’s distinct and unfaltering stand in the migrant issue that boost his popularity.

    It’s clear to everyone that this invasion was engineered to destroy them European. It also poses danger to the real refugees and migrants, too. And they also recognize this danger and protest. The first wave of migrants came on their own expenses, worked hard to make their living and the present influx of migrants ruin their lives too, not only of the Europeans.

    Migrants are protesting, they also had enough of Merkel’s open door policy, and they don’t eat the “racist” and “Islamophobe” shit and raise their voices against this unprecedented destruction and will do something not like the soft, civilized European.

    ” ‘It’s become terrible around here’: MIGRANTS call for Merkel to deport MIGRANTS “

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/722845/German-migrants-call-for-Merkel-to-deport-refugees

    Hopefully Orban will recognize this trend and will know to whom to turn on and to whom to speak.

  2. Jobbik–a party that started its political career on the most extreme fringes of the far-right, but which is now more moderate than the extremist Fidesz.

    Ain’t it nice when a pathetic cheap Commie propagandist praises Nazies?

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